Tag Archive | abuse

WO: Weekly Obsessions

Even though I read all day long as part of my job, I find myself grasping for more content to consume during my downtime. Whether it’s a rainy bus ride or relaxing before bed, I’ve been voraciously reading more long-form articles and novels than usual. For example…

Image Credits Listed Below

    1. “Who Does She Think She Is?”: Acclaimed author Laurie Penny wrote this essay and I hope you’ll take the time to read it. Spoiler alert for my favorite passage: “…any woman … must find a way to dress which is neither too conservative nor too revealing, not too frumpy nor too frivolous, a way of speaking which is neither ‘aggressive’ nor simpering … It’s almost as if the problem weren’t the behavior or the voice or the clothes but the woman wearing them.” DAMN.
    2. “The Silence: The Legacy of Childhood Trauma”: You’ve likely seen this essay from renowned author Junot Diaz shared among your social networks already, so I’m not breaking any ground here by reminding you to again, take the time to read it. The detail and decades of masked pain are heartbreaking and infuriating and excruciating all at once.
    3. “Keep Your Head Up”: Some co-workers were discussing addiction to technology via smartphones and other devices, when one mentioned this article from NYT contributor Adam Popescu. Granted, you have to read it on a device, but the irony was not lost on us. As much as I love the ability to FaceTime family and stay connected to loved ones, it’s also eye-opening to see what physical damage we’re causing on a daily basis.
    4. Mark Zuckerberg on SNL: When you need a break from all that weight of the world, this Weekend Update bit from SNL is sure to win. My work husband used it against me in a meeting today and I full on had a giggle fit in front of 20 people. So yeah, you could say it’s a good one. POKE!

 

 

Images courtesy of: Longreads, New Yorker, NYT, TechCrunch

WO: Weekly Obsessions

I’m back in the SF Bay Area, despite Snowstorm Jonas’s best attempts to keep me grounded in Florida. And this week, I can’t seem to focus on much else besides a friend’s heartbreaking story to bring home her adopted brother.

Courtesy of Family Archives

Please, take a few minutes to read about the plight to #BringDuaneHome. Share it with your networks, say a prayer, reach out to local news or national hosts — anything you think could help to heal their pain.

I know this is one of countless cases where our government agencies fail, and I know it won’t be the last. But whatever can be done to bring justice to Duane and Deirdre’s family is one small step toward the society these children deserve.